conan new

Create a new recipe (with a conanfile.py and other associated files) from either a predefined or a user-defined template.

conan new

$ conan new -h
usage: conan new [-h] [-v [V]] [-cc CORE_CONF] [-d DEFINE] [-f] template

Create a new example recipe and source files from a template.

positional arguments:
  template              Template name, either a predefined built-in or a user-
                        provided one. Available built-in templates: basic,
                        cmake_lib, cmake_exe, meson_lib, meson_exe,
                        msbuild_lib, msbuild_exe, bazel_lib, bazel_exe,
                        autotools_lib, autotools_exe, local_recipes_index.
                        E.g. 'conan new cmake_lib -d name=hello -d
                        version=0.1'. You can define your own templates too by
                        inputting an absolute path as your template, or a path
                        relative to your conan home folder.

options:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -v [V]                Level of detail of the output. Valid options from less
                        verbose to more verbose: -vquiet, -verror, -vwarning,
                        -vnotice, -vstatus, -v or -vverbose, -vv or -vdebug,
                        -vvv or -vtrace
  -cc CORE_CONF, --core-conf CORE_CONF
                        Global configuration for Conan
  -d DEFINE, --define DEFINE
                        Define a template argument as key=value, e.g., -d
                        name=mypkg
  -f, --force           Overwrite file if it already exists

The conan new command creates a new recipe in the current working directory, plus extra example files such as CMakeLists.txt or the test_package folder (as necessary), to either be used as a basis for your own project or aiding in the debugging process.

Note that each template has some required and some [optional] user-defined variables used to customize the resulting files.

The available templates are:

  • basic: Creates a simple recipe with some example code and helpful comments, and is a good starting point to avoid writing boilerplate code.

    Its variables are: [name], [version], [description], [requires1, requires2, …], [tool_requires1, tool_requires2, …]

  • alias: Creates the minimal recipe needed to define an alias to a target recipe

    Its variables are: name, [version], target

  • cmake_lib: Creates a cmake library target that defines a function called name, which will print some information about the compilation environment to stdout. You can add requirements to this template in the form of

    conan new cmake_lib -d name=ai -d version=1.0 -d requires=math/3.14 -d requires=magic/0.0

    This will add requirements for both math/3.14 and magic/0.0 to the requirements() method, will add the necessary find_package``s in CMake, and add a call to ``math() and magic() inside the generated ai() function.

    Its variables are: name, version, [requires1, requires2, …], [tool_requires1, tool_requires2, …]

  • cmake_exe: Creates a cmake executable target that defines a function called name, which will print some information about the compilation environment to stdout. You can add requirements to this template in the form of

    conan new cmake_exe -d name=game -d version=1.0 -d requires=math/3.14 -d requires=ai/1.0

    This will add requirements for both math/3.14 and ai/1.0 to the requirements() method, will add the necessary find_package``s in CMake, and add a call to ``math() and ai() inside the generated game() function.

    Its variables are: name, version, [requires1, requires2, …], [tool_requires1, tool_requires2, …]

  • autotools_lib: Creates an Autotools library.

    Its variables are: name, version

  • autotools_exe: Creates an Autotools executable

    Its variables are: name, version

  • bazel_lib: Bazel integration BazelDeps, BazelToolchain, Bazel is experimental. Creates a Bazel library.

    Its variables are: name, version

  • bazel_exe: Bazel integration BazelDeps, BazelToolchain, Bazel is experimental. Creates a Bazel executable

    Its variables are: name, version

  • meson_lib: Creates a Meson library.

    Its variables are: name, version

  • meson_exe: Creates a Meson executable

    Its variables are: name, version

  • msbuild_lib: Creates a MSBuild library.

    Its variables are: name, version

  • msbuild_exe: Creates a MSBuild executable

    Its variables are: name, version

Warning

The output of the predefined built-in templates is not stable. It might change in future releases to adapt to the latest tools or good practices.

Examples

$ conan new basic

Generates a basic conanfile.py that does not implement any custom functionality

$ conan new basic -d name=mygame -d requires=math/1.0 -d requires=ai/1.3

Generates a conanfile.py for mygame that depends on the packages math/1.0 and ai/1.3

$ conan new cmake_exe -d name=game -d version=1.0 -d requires=math/3.14 -d requires=ai/1.0

Generates the necessary files for a CMake executable target. This will add requirements for both math/3.14 and ai/1.0 to the requirements() method, will add the necessary find_package in CMake, and add a call to math() and ai() inside the generated game() function.

Custom templates

There’s also the possibility of creating your templates. Templates in the Conan home should be located in the templates/command/new folder, and each template should have a folder named like the template one. If we create the templates/command/new/mytemplate folder, the command will be called with the following:

$ conan new mytemplate

As with other files in the Conan home, you can manage these templates with conan config install <url>, putting them in a git repo or an http server and sharing them with your team. It is also possible to use templates from any folder, just passing the full path to the template in the conan new <full_path>, but in general it is more convenient to manage them in the Conan home.

The folder can contain as many files as desired. Both the filenames and the contents of the files can be templatized using Jinja2 syntax. The command -d/--define arguments will define the key=value inputs to the templates.

The file contents will be like (Jinja2 syntax):

# File "templates/command/new/mytemplate/conanfile.py"
from conan import ConanFile

class Conan(ConanFile):
    name = "{{name}}"
    version = "{{version}}"
    license = "{{license}}"

And it will require passing these values:

$ conan new mytemplate -d name=pkg -d version=0.1 -d license=MIT

and it will generate in the current folder a file:

# File "<cwd>/conanfile.py"
from conan import ConanFile

class Conan(ConanFile):
    name = "pkg"
    version = "0.1"
    license = "MIT"

There are some special -d/--defines names. The name one is always mandatory. The conan_version definition will always be automatically defined. The requires and tool_requires definitions, if existing, will be automatically converted to lists. The package_name will always be defined, by default equals to name.

For parametrized filenames, the filenames themselves support Jinja2 syntax. For example if we store a file named literally {{name}} with the brackes in the template folder templates/command/new/mytemplate/, instead of the conanfile.py above:

File: “templates/command/new/mytemplate/{{name}}”
{{contents}}

Then, executing

$ conan new mytemplate -d name=file.txt -d contents=hello!

will create a file called file.txt in the current dir containing the string hello!.

If there are files in the template not to be rendered with Jinja2, like image files, then their names should be added to a file called not_templates inside the template directory, one filename per line. So we could have a folder with:

templates/command/new/mytemplate
                         |- not_templates
                         |- conanfile.py
                         |- image.png
                         |- image2.png

And the not_templates contains the string *.png, then conan new mytemplate ... will only render the conanfile.py through Jinja2, but both images will be copied as-is.